Amazing Benefits Of White Tea For Health and Skin

Although white tea isn’t as well-studied as green and black teas, there’s increasing evidence that the brew can enrich your health.

1) Obesity Control: For a 2009 study, researchers tested white tea’s anti-obesity effects in a series of experiments on human fat cells. Results showed that white-tea extract prompted fat to break down in existing fat cells. What’s more, white tea seemed to reduce the expression of genes crucial to the growth of new fat cells.

While the study’s authors suggest that white tea may be “an ideal natural source of slimming substances,” scientists have yet to explore whether the tea could fight obesity when sipped (rather than administered directly to cells in a lab).

2) Cancer Prevention: White tea may hinder DNA mutations (potentially cancer-causing changes in genetic material) even more efficiently than green tea, according to a 2000 study that tested four white tea varieties (Silver Needle, Flowery Pekoe, Mutan White, and Exotica China White).

In an animal-based study published the following year, researchers found that white tea may be a powerful inhibitor of aberrant crypts (a precursor to colon cancer).

3) Skin Treatment: Topically applied white tea may improve the immune function of skin cells and protect against harmful ultraviolet rays, a 2003 study suggests. It should be noted that the study was funded by a skin-care company that manufactures white-tea-based products.

Using White Tea for Health

Due to the limited research, it’s too soon to recommend white tea as a treatment for any condition. It’s also important to note that self-treating a condition and avoiding or delaying standard care may have serious consequences. If you’re considering using it for any health purpose, make sure to consult your physician first.

Preparing White Tea At Home

  1. Choose the good quality of water. Because hard water may ruin white tea, which has very delicate flavors. 

2. Heat water to boiling, then let it cool for five to eight minutes. Alternatively, only boil the water to “first boil”. This is when the water begins to boil but has not yet begun to simmer. The temperature at this stage will be 160ºF (71ºC). Bitter brews come from too high a temperature of water on green tea; prefer a longer steeping time at a cooler temperature instead.

3. Test the water temperature. Before adding the boiled water to the white tea, it should be no more than 158ºF to 167ºF (70ºC to 75ºC) or 160-170ºF (71-77ºC) at the most. If the water is too hot, the tea will be scalded, causing it to become bitter and astringent.

4. Select your method for brewing the white tea. Use a tea infuser basket, a tea ball, or a teapot. Add two teaspoons of white tea leaves per cup. Place the tea leaves into the infuser basket, tea ball, or teapot.

5. Steep. White tea leaves can withstand longer infusion times than other tea types before pouring. It is usual to steep for 7 to 10 minutes. However, you may wish to experiment with a short steep initially (1 to 3 minutes) and then to graduate to longer steeping times, to find the steeping length you prefer. Use the same leaves for steeping several cups of white tea, with steeping times increasing as needed. Some sources recommend a 90 second to 2 minutes steeping if you intend on steeping the leaves several times.

6. Serve. White tea should be served as it is, unadulterated. You may choose to pour milk or sugar in the white tea, but the already subtle flavor of the tea will be drowned out.

 

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